Hickory Smoked Beef Brisket

Here, succulent, juicy beef feeds a crowd. This can be done in an outdoor smoker, or in your oven using wood chips in a smoker box. Leftovers would be amazing wrapped in tortillas for brisket tacos, or mixed with crispy potatoes and over-easy eggs for a delicious hash.

Prep Time 30 M
Cook Time 8 H
Recipe Yield 10 Servings

INGREDIENTS:

    HELPFUL SUGGESTIONS:

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    DIRECTIONS:

    1. The night before you plan to smoke the beef, trim the brisket of all silverskin but leave as much of the fat cap on the meat as possible.
    2. With a meat injector, inject the brisket with 1 cup of the beef broth, inserting the needle parallel to the grain of the meat about every 2 inches and taking care not to puncture the surface.
    3. Rub all surfaces of the meat with the olive oil, followed by the salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, and cayenne. Rub the seasoning into the meat thoroughly.
    4. Cover and refrigerate overnight.
    5. Preheat smoker to 225F using your favorite combination of charcoal and wood, following your smoker's instructions. (We used hickory.)
    6. If you are not using a smoker, set up a regular grill for indirect heat using a wood chip smoker box, or use your oven and a wood chip smoker box.
    7. 30-60 minutes before putting the beef in the smoker, remove it from the refrigerator to bring it closer to room temperature.
    8. Once the chill has disappeared, place the beef into the smoker.
    9. Once the beef reaches 150-160F, move it into a foil roasting pan carefully, so as not to disturb the brown crust.
    10. Pour the remaining 1 cup of beef broth around the brisket, then cover tightly with aluminum foil.
    11. Continue to smoke until the thermometer reaches 190F.
    12. When the meat registers 190F, move the roasting pan and wrapped brisket to a 190F oven. Allow the meat to rest in the oven, wrapped, for 2-3 hours.
    13. Remove from the oven and slice against the grain of the meat. Serve with the beef broth if desired.

    RECIPE NOTES:

    • According to all the research we did on meat smoking (we really did — we’re nerds), smoking a brisket is notoriously tricky and easy to mess up. Yikes. Here, we took the best pieces of advice from the myriad sources we consulted and came up with a succulent, juicy piece of beef that was ideal for feeding a crowd. This can be done in an outdoor smoker, or in your oven using wood chips in a smoker box. If you somehow have leftovers, they would be amazing wrapped in tortillas for brisket tacos, or mixed with crispy potatoes and over-easy eggs for a delicious hash.

    • In general, allow about 1 hour per pound of meat in the smoker. (Ours took about 8 hours and 15 minutes.)

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